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First Latinx, Now “Elle”: Univision Prepares To Shove No Words Down Viewers’ Throats



On Monday, Univision wrapped up its Pride Month coverage by once again pushing non-words to be part of the Spanish language. On this occasion, the crew of Wake up america pushes for the use of non-binary terms like “She”, a deviation that crushes her, for her, and he, for him, as a new genderless pronoun, regardless of whether less than five percent of the population identifies as non-binary.

The network’s efforts to eliminate grammatically correct – and accepted – Spanish masculine and feminine pronouns have followed countless hours on the air pushing the non-binary, egalitarian non-word. Latinx, in the throats of its viewers. This time around, the premise was that in order to be ‘accepted and included’ by society, you have to be called something that doesn’t exist, like this video compilation from the morning talk show. Wake up america shown:

ASTRID RIVERA: “Elles”, “todes”, “amigues”, “niñes”. Have you noticed that more and more people are using this language?

ACTIVIST: We are not open, or open …

ASTRID RIVERA: For some it’s confusing orally, but for others it’s a correction containing a deeper meaning that establishes gender equality in terms of language. For example, in the word “niño”, you replace the “o” with an “e”.

(….)

RIVERA: Although “she” is the most common inclusive pronoun, the Royal Spanish Academy is still debating whether to accept it or not. In October 2020, the pronoun “she” was included in the observatory of words to be added to the dictionary at any given time. However, a few days later he was eliminated with the statement, “We have eliminated this word because of the confusion it caused. ”

(….)

JUAN CARLOS ESPINOSA: It seems to me that what is important is not the arguments about the vocabulary but the way in which we honor human beings. Inclusiveness provides opportunities to find similarities rather than differences.

(….)

RIVERA: It is estimated that less than 5% of the population identifies as non-binary.

(….)

CARLOS CALDERON: Even if it’s 5% – ten, fifteen – it doesn’t matter. If we need to change our language so that they are respected and feel included, let’s do it.

The Univision report featured three LBGTQ activists pushing for the end of pronouns as we know them in Spanish, where most words have a female and male version; suggesting, for example, that instead of girl for girl, or boy for the boy, the term should be non-sexist baby. No dissenting voice was taken into account in the report.

However, the six-minute rant imploded when Rivera mentioned that in October, the entity that regulates the Spanish language, the Royal Spanish Academy, included the word it– “the most inclusive pronoun”, – “in the observatory of words to be added to the dictionary at a given moment”, they quickly banned it “because of the confusion it caused”.

In its drive to include relevant content on its political agenda, Univision has forgotten who its primary audience is: an audience known to be deeply religious and above all, defender of traditional family values, including the use of her Yes he: her and him.

This push for a liberal agenda is brought to you by Kleenex. Write them down here, and help the MRC fight prejudice in the media.

Maesa Vicente, MRC Latino intern, contributed to this blog.

Click “expand” to read the full transcript of the above-mentioned segment as it airs.

Univision Wake up america
June 28, 2021

CARLOS CALDERON: Thank you for staying with us at Despierta America today. It’s June 28th and people around the world are celebrating LGBTQ Pride Day – a community that has tried to promote inclusion and acceptance through various activities throughout this month.

FRANCISCA LACHAPEL: It’s true. And many wonder, what exactly is this new inclusive language? Astrid Rivera will give us the details. So go ahead, Astrid.

ASTRID RIVERA: “Elles”, “todes”, “amiges”, “niñes”. Have you noticed that more and more people are using this language?

ACTIVIST: We are not open, or open …

ASTRID RIVERA: For some it’s confusing orally, but for others it’s a correction containing a deeper meaning that establishes gender equality in terms of language. For example, in the word “Niño”, you replace the “o” with an “e”.

MONICA TRASANDES: Inclusive language, when used, just sends a message that you respect people. And it shows that you understand that not everyone has a gender identity based on their appearance.

RIVERA: Sexual orientation deals with who you are attracted to and whether you experience romantic, emotional, or sexual attraction.

JUAN CARLOS ESPINOSA: There is a genetic factor when it comes to sexual orientation, so we can’t choose that.

RIVERA: Gender identity refers to a conscious sense in a person of belonging to either male or female.

TRASANDES: We see that young people no longer feel attached or limited to definitions of the past. Some young people who think of themselves as male, or male, say, “you know what, I’m going to wear a little makeup or a skirt…” and that’s okay.

RIVERA: For most people, their gender identity is correlated with their physical appearance. In other words, they feel identified with the gender assigned to them at birth. This is known as cisgender. For others, their gender identity may not be correlated with their physical body. And they may have been born with a partly male body, but are sure they feel like women on the inside, or vice versa. This is called transgender. This is the case of actor Eliot Page, who turned out to be a trans man earlier this year.

DEMI LOVATO: Over the past year and a half, I have done healing and self-reflection work. And through this work, I had the revelation that I identify as non-binary.

RIVERA: Demi Lovato has decided to identify as non-binary, which means that her gender identity does not fully match the female or male gender. At this point, she also decided to change her pronouns to “elle” or “elle” (they / them). It is estimated that less than 5% of the population identifies as non-binary.

MARIA JOSE CARPENA MELERO: It wasn’t until 2020 that I finally felt comfortable going out and publicly identifying myself as a non-binary person.

RIVERA: Maria Jose, there are a lot of people who don’t approve of inclusive language, saying it’s confusing and tends to divide people since some prefer to use this language and others don’t. They believe it forces regular language because it’s something they’re not used to.

CARPENA MELERO: The Spanish we use now … the English we use in work environments … and in fact most modern languages ​​are imposed (language).

RIVERA: Instagram already allows you to choose your pronouns. Although “she” is the most common inclusive pronoun, the Royal Spanish Academy is still debating whether to accept it or not. In October 2020, the pronoun “she” was included in the observatory of words to be added to the dictionary at any given time. However, a few days later he was eliminated with the statement, “We have eliminated this word because of the confusion it caused. You started using the pronoun “she” in 2020, or almost since last year. How have you felt since you started using (the term) and breaking free within that identity?

MELERO: It’s like starting to exist inside of a person who’s been there for over two decades and who didn’t know how to identify because they didn’t fall under male or female characteristics.

ESPINOSA: It seems to me that what is important is not the arguments over vocabulary, but the way we treat other human beings with dignity through inclusion, as well as the opportunities to find common ground. rather than differences.

CARPENA MELERO: Respecting identity is also respecting existence. It’s not that hard to refer to someone as “her”. It’s not that hard to start using inclusive language.

CARLOS CALDERON: The truth is, it’s complicated but you might find it easier to do what one of the girls said about using that language in terms of respect. Even if it’s 5% – ten, fifteen – it doesn’t matter. If we need to change our language so that they are respected and feel included, let’s do it.

LACHAPEL: We show our respect by taking the time to understand what they want to be called. I like the way things are done and that little by little we are becoming more inclusive. There is still a lot to do but I think we are going in the right direction.

CALDERON: And also that the members of this community be patient with us because it is also difficult for us to adapt to these pronouns.

JESUS ​​DIAZ: And the more it is understood, the more you accept it, I think that is the key. The more you understand the process, the more you accept it.

CALDERON: Gender rights equal peace.



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